Animal Science Department

 

Date of this Version

12-2012

Citation

Bittner, C. J. EVALUATION OF SOYBEAN HULLS AND FEED ADDITIVES IN FINISHING BEEF DIETS. MS Thesis, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2012.

Comments

A THESIS Presented to the Faculty of The Graduate College at the University of Nebraska In Partial Fulfillment of Requirements For the Degree of Master of Science, Major: Animal Science, Under the Supervision of Professors Terry J. Klopfenstein and Galen E. Erickson. Lincoln, Nebraska: December, 2012

Copyright (c) 2012 Curtis J. Bittner

Abstract

Replacing the amount of corn in finishing diets with ethanol byproducts, such as distillers grains, has been well researched and improves performance. However, research when including soybean hulls (SBH) in feedlot finishing diets with distillers grains is limited. Two feedlot experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of SBH on animal performance and carcass characteristics in finishing diets. Dietary concentrations of SBH used were 0, 12.5, 25, and 37.5% of diet DM, in both experiments. Modified distillers grains plus solubles was included in the diet at 25% for Exp.1 while Exp. 2 contained an inclusion level of 40% wet distillers grains plus solubles (DM basis). In Exp. 1, as SBH concentrations increased, DMI decreased linearly when fed to yearling steers. Response to increasing concentrations of SBH, resulted in ADG and G:F decreasing linearly when utilizing yearlings. Utilizing calf-feds in Exp. 2, there was a tendency for a linear increase in ADG; gain was greatest with the inclusion of 12.5% SBH. Gain to feed tended to respond quadratically, with optimum inclusion of SBH being 12.5%. The feeding value of SBH at concentrations of 12.5 and 25% were greater than that of corn when wet distillers grains plus solubles (WDGS) was included in the diet. In an effort to optimize feed utilization and animal performance, a cattle finishing experiment was conducted evaluating the effects of NEXT ENHANCE (NEX) and monensin/tylosin (MT) on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and liver abscesses in finishing diets. There was no significant MT x NEX interaction, therefore main effects are presented. In diets containing MT, a 3.9% improvement in G:F was observed but when feeding NEX, G:F was not affected. Incidence of liver abscesses decreased 45.7% when MT was fed compared to diets without MT. Feeding soybean hulls at 12.5% can replace a portion of corn in finishing diets with WDGS and with the use of monensin plus tylosin an improvement in G:F can be expected.

Advisors: Terry J. Klopfenstein and Galen E. Erickson

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