The UNL Core for Applied Genomics and Ecology (CAGE) announces that it is now offering a new suite of services to UNL investigators and outside entities. Formerly known as the UNL Printed Microarray Core Facility, CAGE now offers Next Gen sequencing on its newly installed Roche-454 GS FLX. In support of the UNL Gut Function Initiative, CAGE specializes in application of the GS-FLX platform for analysis of complex microbial communities by massively parallel sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons. CAGE also has expertise in shotgun sequencing applications on the instrument, including whole genome sequencing and analysis of BACs and metagenome libraries.

CAGE is directed by Dr. Andrew Benson, Professor of Food Microbiology in the Department of Food Science and Technology. “We have been training hard as teams of personnel to provide expert services for shotgun and amplicon sequencing protocols on the GS-FLX”, said Benson. “The range of applications is growing rapidly -- this enabling technology is literally blowing the doors wide open to fields that have previously been experimentally intractable.”

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