Animal Science Department

 

Date of this Version

1995

Comments

Published in 1995 Nebraska Swine Report, edited by Duane Reese; published and copyright © 1995 Animal Science Department, University of Nebraska – Lincoln.

Abstract

The value of pork trim depends on its lean content. Accurate assessment of composition is necessary for proper pricing. Procedures often used to estimate composition lack accuracy and require time, thus a rapid, accurate, non-invasive technology to determine lean content of pork trim is needed.

Electromagnetic scanning, also known as ToBEC (total body electrical conductivity), has been studied for prediction of lean in hams (see 1994 Swine Report, p. 8). The equipment consists of a stainless steel cabinet containing a large, plastic-covered coil, through which meat is conveyed. Energy is absorbed from the electromagnetic field by the sample. Because lean is more conductive than fat, the peak of the scanning curve is highly related to lean content. Prior research has demonstrated a strong relationship between electromagnetic scanning and pork carcass lean content (see 1994 Swine Report, p. 5). This study was conducted to evaluate electromagnetic scanning for estimation of pork trim composition.

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