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The Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN): Validity and reliability in an adolescent community sample

Helena S Johnson, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

Social phobia and social anxiety are highly prevalent psychological conditions in children and adolescents. Due to the known risks associated with the spectrum of social anxiety in youth, early detection with valid and reliable assessment measures is imperative. A review of the available modes of assessment for social anxiety and social phobia in youth is provided with an emphasis on the psychometric properties and clinical utility of existing measures. Because research to date on self-report measures of social phobia in adolescents is limited, the primary objective of the present study was to contribute to the literature by examining the validity and reliability of a new self-report measure for social phobia, The Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN), in a community sample of adolescents. The SPIN is a 17-item measure purported to assess the full spectrum of social phobia symptomatology. Previously, psychometric research on the SPIN in adult populations has demonstrated its validity and reliability. In the current psychometric examination, results revealed strong support for both the temporal stability and construct validity of the SPIN, suggesting it is an appropriate screening measure for the assessment of social phobia in adolescents. Clinical implications and suggestions for future research are discussed. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Clinical|Psychology, Psychometrics

Recommended Citation

Johnson, Helena S, "The Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN): Validity and reliability in an adolescent community sample" (2005). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI3209275.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI3209275

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