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Establishing a model of Communication Privacy Management theory: Examining the criteria that predict an emerging adult's likelihood to reveal private information to their parents

Joshua R Hammonds, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

The primary goal of this study was to establish a model based on Communication Privacy Management (CPM) theory that investigated the process of privacy management between the parent and the emerging adult child (N = 851) to understand which salient variables predict an individual’s likelihood to reveal private information. In order to establish a model predicting the likelihood of revealing private information, the researcher first operationalized, modified, tested, and confirmed the validity of extant measures for the CPM criteria variables argued for in the literature (culture, gender, context, motivation, and risk-benefit ratio) engaging the theory. Through structural equation modeling, three psychosocial outcome variables were also examined to determine how an emerging adult child’s levels of rumination, stress, and well-being are affected as they become more likely to reveal the private information. Results indicated that emerging adult children reporting (a) a communicatively-open family relational culture, (b) low levels of relational quality, and (c) low levels of relational risk are more likely to reveal private information to their parents, while, (d) personal characteristics, (e) perceived reciprocity, (f) characteristics of the confidant, and (g) stigma risks did not display significant relationships with one’s likelihood to reveal private information. In addressing the decision-making process of privacy management, results indicated that individuals who are more likely to reveal are more likely to ruminate about the private matter. The implications of these findings are that the predictors of privacy management center on the communication and relational factors between the emerging adult child and their parents. The model validated within the study should serve as an exemplar model of CPM and be applied to various relational contexts and topics to more clearly identify the predictors of one’s likelihood to reveal as well as gain a richer understanding of the privacy management process. The research report concludes with a discussion of the theoretical and practical implications of these findings for families, practitioners, and privacy management researchers. ^

Subject Area

Speech Communication|Sociology, Individual and Family Studies

Recommended Citation

Hammonds, Joshua R, "Establishing a model of Communication Privacy Management theory: Examining the criteria that predict an emerging adult's likelihood to reveal private information to their parents" (2009). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI3379241.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI3379241

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