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Industrial Technology Education teachers' knowledge, skill and attitudes related to working with mainstreamed special population students in the Lincoln, Nebraska, public schools

Robert Thomas Howell, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

This research employed both quantitative and qualitative methods to analyze survey data that was utilized to identify the attitudes, skills, and knowledge Industrial Technology Education teachers have towards including special needs students into their classrooms. Twenty Industrial Technology Education teachers from the Lincoln, Nebraska, Public Schools participated in the study. ^ The purpose of the study were to identify the attitudes of industrial technology education teachers toward bringing special needs students into their regular classrooms to determine what preparation (i.e., courses, workshops and inservice training) industrial technology education teachers have that supports them while working with included special needs students and to determine what preparation (i.e., skills, knowledge about students, teaching methods) industrial technology education teachers have that would aid them in the future, when working with special needs students. ^ Frequencies were reported and a 2 x 3 ANOVA used to compare the differences in number of years teaching and grade levels taught. ^ There was no significant difference (at the .05 level of confidence) between years of teaching experience, grade levels taught and the attitudes, skills, and knowledge of industrial technology education teachers surveyed. ^ Industrial technology education teachers surveyed noted that they were comfortable with the inclusion of special needs students into their regular classrooms and that they did a good job of adapting materials to teach these students. The respondents also indicated that inservice professional days were the preferred method to gain more skills in aiding them with special needs students in the future. ^

Subject Area

Education, Adult and Continuing|Education, Special|Education, Vocational

Recommended Citation

Howell, Robert Thomas, "Industrial Technology Education teachers' knowledge, skill and attitudes related to working with mainstreamed special population students in the Lincoln, Nebraska, public schools" (1999). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI9936759.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI9936759

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