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Health promotion programs for faculty and staff at religious -affiliated small colleges and universities

Vicki L Boye, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

This study had a three-fold purpose: it examined the existence and scope of faculty/staff health promotion programs at religious-affiliated small colleges and universities in the United States; it evaluated the quality of these programs against criteria based on Association for Worksite Health Promotion (AWHP) quality standards; and it proposed a model for the establishment of effective faculty/staff health promotion programs at these institutions. ^ Ninety-eight of the 256 institutions (38.3%) with student FTE undergraduate enrollments of 500–1500, and affiliated with either the Baptist, Catholic, Church of Christ, Lutheran, Methodist, Nazarene, Presbyterian, or Seventh-day Adventist church denominations returned questionnaires. Twenty-three institutions (23.5%) reported having a faculty/staff health promotion program. No significant differences were found between institutions with and without faculty/staff programs for religious affiliation, presidential characteristics, age of faculty and staff, and stability of organizational size, but they were found for number of faculty and staff (p < .05) and decision-makers for program initiation (p < .10). ^ The lack of financial resources and the lack of time among qualified personnel for program development and management was cited by institutions without a faculty/staff program as the most formidable barriers to initiating a program. ^ The effectiveness of the 23 faculty/staff programs was compared with a set of ten criteria developed from questionnaire data and the AWHP quality standards. These criteria concerned: goals, programming (content, quality, and convenience), personnel (qualifications and time allocation), budget allocation, assessment, and evaluation (procedures and communication of results). Participation levels for nine of these 10 criteria showed no significant differences. Participation levels were significantly higher (p < .10) for programs with higher budgets ($2500+) than for those with lower budgets (≤$1500). Interviews were conducted with six respondents from programs meeting at least four of the criteria for program effectiveness. ^ Based on findings from these interviews, the questionnaires, and a review of literature, a model for effective faculty/staff health promotion programs at religious-affiliated small colleges and universities was proposed. ^

Subject Area

Education, Adult and Continuing|Education, Health|Education, Higher

Recommended Citation

Boye, Vicki L, "Health promotion programs for faculty and staff at religious -affiliated small colleges and universities" (1999). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI9942115.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI9942115

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