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Authors

Albert Gallatin

Date of this Version

1847

Citation

Published by BARTLETT & WELFORD: NO. 7 ASTOR HOUSE, NEW YORK. 1847.

Abstract

I.-- THE LAW OF NATIONS.

Il. -- INDEMNITIES TO CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES.

III. -- ANNEXATION OF TEXAS.

IV. -- NEGOTIATIONS AND WAR.

V. -- THE CLAIM OF TEXAS TO THE RIO DEL NORTE, AS ITS BOUNDARY, EXAMINED

VI. -- RECAPITULATION.

VII. -- THE MISSION OF THE UNITED STATES.

VIII. -- TERMS OF PEACE

At present the only object is Peace, immediate peace, a just peace, and no acquisition of territory, but that which may be absolutely necessary for effecting the great object in view. The most simple terms, those which will only provide for the adjustment of the Texas boundary and for the payment of the indemnities due to our citizens, and, in every other respect, restore things as they stood before the beginning of hostilities, appear to me the most eligible. There are other considerations, highly important, and not foreign to the great question of an extension of territory, but which may without any inconvenience or commitment, be postponed, and should not be permitted to impede the immediate termination of this lamentable war. I have gone farther than I intended. It is said that a rallying point is wanted by the friends of peace. Let them unite, boldly express their opinions, and use their utmost endeavors in promoting an immediate termination of the war. For the people, no other banner is necessary. But their representatives in Congress assembled are alone competent to ascertain, alone vested with the legitimate power of deciding what course should be pursued at this momentous crisis, what are the best means for carrying into effect their own views, whatever these may be.