History, Department of

 

Date of this Version

9-29-2008

Comments

Text copyright © 2008 the Estates of Edna Glenn, Willard Hughes Rollings, and Abbott Sekaquaptewa, and Barton Wright, Michael Kabotie, Terrance Talaswaima, Alice Schlegel, Robert H. Ames, Peter Iverson, and John R. Wunder. All images and artwork copyright by the individual artists; for a listing see pages 9-14.

A hardcover printed edition of this book is available for purchase at http://www.lulu.com/content/5169390
The book is 168 pages, 8.5x11", with 75 color plates. The cost is $56.60.

Abstract

Contents

EDITOR’S NOTE

CONTENTS

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

PREFACE: Edna Glenn, Texas Tech University and John R. Wunder, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

COMMENTARY I: CELEBRATION: Edna Glenn

1 THE HOPI NATION IN 1980: “It is a time to recall and to revitalize the good things of Hopi life and to celebrate Hopism.” Abbott Sekaquaptewa, Chairman, Hopi Tribal Council

EXEMPLARY ARTS: SECTION A — Subject: Concepts of Emergence and Migration: Edna Glenn

2 HOPI MESAS AND MIGRATIONS: LAND AND PEOPLE: “Here among the sandstone mesas you will find the Hopis. ‘Among them we settled as rain....’” Lomawywesa (Michael Kabotie), Hopi Cultural Center and Museum, Second Mesa

EXEMPLARY ARTS: SECTION B — Subject: Corn as Life Essence: Edna Glenn

3 THE HOPI WAY: ART AS LIFE, SYMBOL, AND CEREMONY: “As artists, we try to document every aspect of Hopi life. We know the Hopi way; we live it, we can taste, we can see, and we can smell Hopi.” Honvantewa (Terrance Talaswaima), Hopi Cultural Center and Museum, Second Mesa

EXEMPLARY ARTS: SECTION C — Subject: Ceremony - Ancient and Contemporary Images: Edna Glenn

EXEMPLARY ARTS: SECTION D — Subject: Contemporary Arts and Crafts: Edna Glenn

COMMENTARY II: CEREMONY: Edna Glenn

4 HOPI KACHINAS: A LIFE FORCE: “Everything has an essence or life force, and humans must interact with these or fail to survive.” Barton Wright , Museum of Man, San Diego

EXEMPLARY ARTS: SECTION E — Subject: Kachinas: Edna Glenn

5 HOPI SOCIAL STRUCTURE AS RELATED TO TIHU SYMBOLISM: “Life is the highest good; in an environment where survival requires constant effort, . . . the richest blessing is abundance of food and children.” Alice Schlegel, University of Arizona

6 CONTEMPORARY HOPI COURTS AND LAW: “We believe we are ‘at the center’ and this gives us a very secure feeling about where we are, where we have been, and what we are going to do.” Piestewa (Robert H. Ames), Chief Judge, Hopi Tribal Trial Court

7 THE ENDURING HOPI: “What then is the meaning of the tricentennial observance? It is a reaffirmation of continuity and hope for the collective Hopi future.” Peter Iverson, Arizona State University

COMMENTARY III: CHALLENGE: Edna Glenn

HOPI ESSENCE: SELF-PORTRAIT AND POEM: Lomawywesa (Michael Kabotie)

CONTRIBUTORS

BIBLIOGRAPHY


The “Document” is a PDF file of the entire book, optimized to 200ppi to reduce the file size to about 10 Mbytes. A non-optimized file (@ 300 ppi; 25 Mbytes) is attached as a “related” or “supplementary” file.

Wunder Book revised 10-7.pdf (25044 kB)
Higher resolution (art @ 300 ppi)