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Authors

J. Overland, NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA
L. Bengtsson, Max-Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany
R. Przybylak, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń, Poland
J. Walsh, International Arctic Research Center, Fairbanks, Alaska
J. Richter-Menge, ERDC-Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, Hanover, NH
S. Nghiem, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA
D. Perovich, ERDC-Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, Hanover, NH
I. Rigor, Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
A. Proshutinsky, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Woods Hole, MA
J. Morison, Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
V. Romanovsky, Geophyiscal Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK
R. Armstrong, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO
L.D. Hinzman, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK
N. Oberman, MIREKO Stock Co., Syktyvkar, Russia
A. Shiklomanov, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH
E. Hanna, Department of Geography, University of Sheffield, UK
J. Box, Byrd Polar Research Center, The Ohio State University, USA
P. Huybrechts, Departement Geografie, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium
R. Van Bogaert, FWO - Flanders Research Foundation, Geography Department, Ghent University, Belgium
D. Walker, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK
G.J. Jia, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, China
O. Grau, Plant Biology Department, Unit of Botany, University of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
M. Hallinger, Institute for Botany and Landscape Ecology, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany
M. De Dapper, Geography Department, Ghent University, Belgium
C. Jonasson, Abisko Scientific Research Station, Abisko, Sweden
T.V. Callaghan, Abisko Scientific Research Station, Abisko, Sweden
D. Russell, Scientist Emeritus, Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada, Yukon, Canada
M.J.J.E. Loonen, University of Groningen, Arctic Centre
C. Zöckler, UNEP-WCMC, Cambridge
B. Ebbinge, Alterra, Wageningen

Date of this Version

10-2007

Comments

Arctic Report Card 2007, http://www.arctic.noaa.gov/report07.

Abstract

Collectively, the observations indicate that the overall warming of the Arctic system continued in 2007. There are some elements that are stabilizing or returning to climatological norms. These mixed tendencies illustrate the sensitivity and complexity of the Arctic System.

Atmosphere: Hot spot shifts toward Europe

Ocean: North Pole Temperatures at depth returning to 1990s values

Sea Ice: Summer extent at record minimum

Greenland: Recent warm temperatures associated with net ice loss

Biology: increasing tundra shrub cover and variable treeline advance; up to 80% declines in some caribou herds while goose populations double

Land: Increase in permafrost temperatures

The Arctic Report Card 2007 is introduced as a means of presenting clear, reliable and concise information on recent observations of environmental conditions in the Arctic, relative to historical time series records. It provides a method of updating and expanding the content of the State of the Arctic Report, published in fall 2006, to reflect current conditions. Material presented in the Report Card is prepared by an international team of scientists and is peer-reviewed by topical experts nominated by the US Polar Research Board. The audience for the Arctic Report Card is wide, including scientists, students, teachers, decision makers and the general public interested in Arctic environment and science. The web-based format will facilitate future timely updates of the content.

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