US Fish & Wildlife Service

 

Date of this Version

2004

Citation

Kelley, J.R., Jr. 2004. American woodcock population status, 2004. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Laurel, Maryland. 15pp.

Abstract

Singing-ground and Wing-collection surveys were conducted to assess the population status of the American woodcock (Scolopax minor). Singing-ground Survey data indicated that the numbers of displaying woodcock in the Eastern and Central Regions in 2004 were unchanged from 2003 (P>0.1). There was not a significant trend in woodcock heard on the Singing-ground Survey in either the Eastern or Central Region during 1995-04. This represents the first time since 1992 that the 10-year trend estimate for either region was not a significant decline. There were long-term (1968-04) declines of 2.1% per year in the Eastern Region and 1.8% per year in the Central Region. The 2003 recruitment index for the U.S. portion of the Eastern Region (1.5 immatures per adult female) was slightly higher than the 2002 index (1.4 immatures per adult female), but was 12% below the long-term regional average. The 2003 recruitment index for the U.S. portion of the Central Region (1.4 immatures per adult female) was 19% below the 2002 index (1.7 immatures per adult female), and 16% below the long-term regional average. The preliminary 2003 recruitment index for eastern Canada (Ontario, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia combined) was 3.0 immatures per adult female, which was 18% higher than the 2002 index. The Harvest Information Program indicated that U.S. woodcock hunters in the Eastern Region spent 152,300 days afield and harvested 89,200 birds during the 2003-04 season. In the Central Region, U.S. hunters spent 369,900 days afield and harvested 213,500 woodcock. In Canada, 4,388 successful woodcock hunters harvested 34,654 birds during the 2003-04 season.



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