Papers in the Biological Sciences

 

Authors

Karsten Klopffleisch, University of Cologne, Cologne
Nguyen Phan, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Kelsey Augustin, Wayne State College, Wayne
Robert S. Bayne, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Katherine S. Booker, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Jose R. Botella, University of Queensland, Brisbane
Nicholas C. Carpita, Purdue University, West Lafayette
Tyrell Carr, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Jin-Gui Chen, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Biosciences Division
Thomas Ryan Cooke, University of Georgia, Athens
Arwen Frick-Cheng, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Erin J. Friedman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Brandon Fulk, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Michael G. Hahn, University of Georgia, Athens
Kun Jiang, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Lucia Jorda, Universidad Polite´ cnica de Madrid
Lydia Kruppe, University of Cologne, Cologne
Chenggang Liu, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Justine Lorek, Max-Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Cologne
Maureen C. McCann, Purdue University, West Lafayette
Antonio Molina, Universidad Polite´ cnica de Madrid
Etsuko N. Moriyama, University of Georgia, Athens
M. Shahid Mukhtar, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill & University of Alabama at Birmingham
Yashwanti Mudgil, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill & University of Delhi
Sivakumar Pattathil, University of Georgia, Athens
John Schwarz, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Steven Seta, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Matthew Tan, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Ulrike Temp, University of Cologne, Cologne
Yuri Trusov, University of Queensland, Brisbane
Daisuke Urano, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Bastian Welter, University of Cologne, Cologne
Jing Yang, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Ralph Panstruga, Max-Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Cologne & RWTH Aachen University, Aachen & Aachen UniversityFollow
Joachim F. Uhrig, University of Cologne, Cologne & University of CologneFollow
Alan M. Jones, University of North Carolina at Chapel HillFollow

Date of this Version

2011

Citation

Molecular Systems Biology 7:532 doi:10.1038/msb.2011.66

Comments

2011 EMBO and Macmillan Publishers Limited

Abstract

The heterotrimeric G-protein complex is minimally composed of Ga, Gb, and Gc subunits. In the classic scenario, the G-protein complex is the nexus in signaling from the plasma membrane, where the heterotrimeric G-protein associates with heptahelical G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), to cytoplasmic target proteins called effectors. Although a number of effectors are known in metazoans and fungi, none of these are predicted to exist in their canonical forms in plants. To identify ab initio plant G-protein effectors and scaffold proteins, we screened a set of proteins from the G-protein complex using two-hybrid complementation in yeast. After deep and exhaustive interrogation, we detected 544 interactions between 434 proteins, of which 68 highly interconnected proteins form the core G-protein interactome. Within this core, over half of the interactions comprising two-thirds of the nodes were retested and validated as genuine in planta. Co-expression analysis in combination with phenotyping of loss-of-function mutations in a set of core interactome genes revealed a novel role for G-proteins in regulating cell wall modification.

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