Off-campus UNL users: To download campus access dissertations, please use the following link to log into our proxy server with your NU ID and password. When you are done browsing please remember to return to this page and log out.

Non-UNL users: Please talk to your librarian about requesting this dissertation through interlibrary loan.

Examining Retrospective Measurement of Ambivalence about First Births and Psychological Well-Being Using a Hybrid Cross-Survey Multiple Imputation Approach

Stacy Tiemeyer, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

This dissertation follows a 3 article format. First, I implement strategies for combining the three surveys and evaluating the individual unique measures of fertility intentions status to a combined survey latent class analysis. I found that the best fitting solution, based upon theories, qualitative research, and prior research with each survey alone, included four latent classes of first birth intentions: intended, unintended, and two categories of ambivalent: okay either way and conflicted. Second, using fertility intentions classes identified in the second chapter, I use three theories (Theory of Planned Behavior, Traits-Desires-Intentions-Behaviors and Theory of Conjunctural Action) to extend research on the predictors of pregnancy intention status. I evaluate the three theories of pregnancy intentions using multinomial logistic regression models. In the fourth chapter, I use Stress Process Theory to test whether pregnancy intentions, more specifically ambivalent intentions, matter for psychological well-being. ^ This dissertation contributes to sociology by expanding applications of data combination and cross-survey multiple imputation using a hybrid bridging model. Furthermore, I identified four categories of intendedness, and distinguished between two categories of ambivalence: conflicted and okay either way. Conflicted women were more likely to report using birth control prior to conception, and women who were okay either wanted a pregnancy more than they tried to get pregnant. Future research should examine whether trying means the same thing to all women. Women from higher socioeconomic status were more likely to have an intended first birth. Exposure to socioeconomic stressors post-birth explains variation in psychological wellbeing by first birth intentions.^

Subject Area

Statistics|Sociology

Recommended Citation

Tiemeyer, Stacy, "Examining Retrospective Measurement of Ambivalence about First Births and Psychological Well-Being Using a Hybrid Cross-Survey Multiple Imputation Approach" (2018). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI10793726.
https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI10793726

Share

COinS