Libraries at University of Nebraska-Lincoln

 

Date of this Version

2-3-2016

Citation

Igbinovia, M.O. (2015). Emotional Self Awareness and Information Literacy Competence as Correlates of Task Performance of Academic Library Personnel. Library Philosophy and Practice (e-journal)

Abstract

The academic library of the 21st century is challenged with the need to make the library lucrative for users, hence the performance of academic library personnel is emphasized as an important factor influenced by variables such as the emotional self awareness and information literacy competence of library personnel. Thus, this study seeks to investigate emotional self awareness and information literacy competence as correlates of task performance among personnel in academic libraries in Edo state, Nigeria. The survey research design was employed for the study with a population size of 181 library personnel in the 15 academic libraries under study and total enumeration was adopted as the sampling technique. Of the 181 copies of questionnaire administered, 163 copies were retrieved and found valid for analysis. Five research questions and four null hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. The result of the study showed that personnel in the academic libraries in studied have high emotional self awareness, good information literacy competence and high task performance. The independent variables of emotional self awareness and information literacy competence had significant positive correlation with task performance. Emotional self awareness had significant positive correlation to information literacy competence and both emotional self awareness and information literacy competence jointly and significantly correlate with task performance of personnel. It was recommended that self development by personnel and capacity building by management of academic libraries, with the aim of enhancing the emotional self awareness and information literacy competence of the academic library personnel should be ensured.

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