Agronomy and Horticulture Department

 

Title

Advanced Backcross Breeding

Date of this Version

2019

Document Type

Article

Citation

Plant and Soil Sciences eLibrary (PASSeL) Lessons.

Comments

Copyright 2019, the authors. Used by permission.

This project was supported in part by the National Research Initiative Competitive Grants CAP project 2011-68002-30029 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, administered by the University of California-Davis and by the National Science Foundation (NSF), Division of Undergraduate Education, National SMETE Digital Library Program, Award #0938034, administered by the University of Nebraska. Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the USDA or NSF.

Development of this lesson was supported in part by Cooperative State Research, Education, & Extension Service, U.S. Dept of Agriculture under Agreement Number 98-EATP-1-0403 administered by Cornell University and the American Distance Education Consortium (ADEC). Any opinions, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Abstract

This lesson is a detailed explanation of the backcross breeding process. Variations based on whether backcrossing is performed with dominant, recessive, or multiple traits are discussed. Calculations associated with backcross breeding are explained.

Overview:

This lesson explains the importance of the backcross method in the development of improved crop varieties. The theory behind the method, plus its strengths, weaknesses and requirements will be discussed.

Objectives:

At the completion of this lesson you will be able to:

  • List the requirements of a successful backcrossing program.
  • Explain how to move a single gene from one variety to another.
  • Describe how two or more genes can be backcrossed into cultivars.
  • Discuss both the strengths and limitations of the backcrossing method.
  • Outline the importance of backcrossing in the development of transgenic crops.
  • Explain two reasons why backcross breeding is done.
  • Discuss how the backcrossing process for a dominant gene is different than that of a recessive gene.
  • Calculate the following:
    1. the percentage of non-target genes from the donor parent
    2. homozygosity of the parents in a generation
    3. the probability of eliminating an undesirable allele while backcrossing

Modules:

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