The Ph.D. program in the College of Engineering is a unified program with various participating fields, one of which is Computer Engineering. The time necessary to complete the doctoral degree varies greatly, but three to four years beyond the MS degree is typical. A Ph.D. supervisory committee, in consultation with the student, arranges an appropriate program of study for completion of the doctoral requirements. A minimum of 90 graduate credit hours (including transfer hours from an approved MS degree) beyond the BS degree is required for a doctoral degree. At least 45 hours must be completed at UNL, and 27 credit hours must be completed within 18 consecutive months to satisfy the Ph.D. residency requirement.
In addition to graduate course work, doctoral students must complete a written Ph.D. dissertation with an oral presentation and defense. The dissertation topic must be approved by the supervisory committee and the Graduate Committee Chair. The dissertation itself should reveal a capacity to perform independent research and should represent a significant advancement of knowledge.

PhD candidates: You are welcome and encouraged to deposit your dissertation here, but be aware that
1) it is optional, not required (the ProQuest deposit is required); and
2) it will be available to everyone on the Internet; there is no embargo for dissertations in the UNL DigitalCommons.

Master's candidates: Deposit of your thesis is required. If an embargo is necessary, you may deposit the thesis at http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/embargotheses/ with the prior approval of your department and the Graduate Office (contact Terri Eastin).

All depositors: We try to observe a 24-hour "cooling off" period to give you opportunity to correct those "oops" issues that seem to emerge just after deposit.
Upon deposit, you will immediately receive an email that your submission has been received (and this is what you need to show the Graduate Office).
However, you can still log back in and select Revise and upload a new version with your advisor's name spelled right, or your mother thanked in the Acknowledgments, or whatever you're stressing about.
After about a day, your submission will be "published" or "posted", making it available to the Internet; you will get another email to that effect, and your submission can no longer be changed--by you.
If further changes are needed, these can be made by sending a revised file to the administrator < proyster@unl.edu > requesting replacement of the current online version. DO NOT RESUBMIT YOUR THESIS / DISSERTATION. That creates duplicate records, confusion, wasted effort, frustration, sadness, tears, and causes kittens to get sick.

Finally: Congratulations; you are almost there. Click the "Submit your paper or article" link at the bottom of the gray box at left. Follow the instructions. You should be able to copy (Ctrl-C) and paste (Ctrl-V) most fields.
You are the sole author; your advisor is not considered a co-author.
Your institution is "University of Nebraska-Lincoln" (not "at Lincoln" or ", Lincoln"). Do not leave it blank; then the administrator has to fill it in, and he is tempted to make it something silly.
You do not need to repeat your name and title in the Abstract field; just the body of the abstract.
When you reach the question "Was this submission previously published in a journal?", just skip that part.
Be sure to click the "Submit" button at the bottom. Files upload at the rate of about 5 Mb per minute, so if you have an ungodly large file, it may take a bit of time. If your file exceeds 40 Mb, think about reducing its size--there are many ways; Google "reduce pdf file size" to find some.

Okay, get started. That thesis is not going to submit itself.

Follow

2013

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Analysis of the Feasibility of Utilizing Wakeup Radios to Optimize Energy and Latency Performance of Wireless Sensor Networks, Benjamin D. Parks

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A Study on Countermeasures against Steganography: an Active Warden Approach, Qilin Qi

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Design and Implementation of a Hybrid Technology Networking System, Sushanta Mohan Rakshit

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A STUDY OF DISTRIBUTED BEAMFORMING IN COGNITIVE RADIO NETWORKS, Omi Sunuwar

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Adaptive Co-Scheduler for Highly Dynamic Resources, Kartik Vedalaveni

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Cross-layer Optimized Wireless Video Surveillance, Yun Ye

2012

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A Multi-Modal Sensing and Communication Platform for Continental-Scale Migratory Bird Tracking, David J. Anthony

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CONDUCTIVE CONCRETE FOR ELECTROMAGNETIC SHIELDING – METHODS FOR DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION, Aaron P. Krause

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AN ULTRA-LOW POWER COMMUNICATION PROTOCOL FOR A SELF-POWERED WIRELESS SENSOR BASED ANIMAL MONITORING SYSTEM, Tao Ma

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Energy Efficiency Analysis and Optimization on Mobile Video Wireless Delivery, Jianxin Sun

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AN INVESTIGATION OF SECURITY CHALLENGES IN COGNITIVE RADIO NETWORKS, Deepraj S. Vernekar

2011

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OPTIMIZED DELAY-SENSITIVE MULTIMEDIA COMMUNICATIONS OVER WIRELESS NETWORKS, Haiyan Luo

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Exploration of Spatial Diversity in Multi-Antenna Wireless Communication Systems, Shichuan Ma

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A Study of Correlations between the Definition and Application of the Gene Ontology, Yuji Mo

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STUDY OF CELLULAR PHONE DETECTION TECHNIQUES, Nicholas W. Scott

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A NOVEL TELECOMMUNICATIONS-BASED APPROACH TO MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF HIV INFECTION, Aaron T. Sharp

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A Quantitative Performance Analysis of 2.5 GHz and 3.65 GHz Mobile WiMAX, Pradhumna L. Shrestha

2010

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PERFORMANCE OF SELF-ENCODED SPREAD SPECTRUM UNDER WORST-CASE JAMMING, Casey L. Deyle

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Study of Physical Layer Security in Wireless Communications, Mustafa Duruturk

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A COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF LTE PHYSICAL LAYER, Fahimeh Rezaei

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Cross-Layer Optimized Wireless Multimedia Networking, Dalei Wu

2009

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ROBUST IMAGE AND VIDEO CODING WITH ADAPTIVE RATE CONTROL, Hongqiang Wang

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QUALITY-DRIVEN CROSS LAYER DESIGN FOR MULTIMEDIA SECURITY OVER RESOURCE CONSTRAINED WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS, Wei Wang

2008

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SELF-ENCODED SPREAD SPECTRUM SYNCHRONIZATION AND COOPERATIVE DIVERSITY, Kun Hua