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Like mother, like daughter? Perceived gender ideology and objectified body consciousness within the mother-daughter relationship

Lindsey W Sherd, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

The current study sought to explain how gender socialization occurs within the mother-daughter relationship, and attempted to illuminate the devastating consequences of traditional feminine standards. The maternal role model was explored as a cultural transmitter, enforcer, and potential protector from the impact of these feminine standards on her daughter. To examine these relationships two models were tested: first, a mediation model examined the mediating role of mothers’ objectified body consciousness between mothers’ gender ideology and daughters’ gender ideology and objectified body consciousness; second, a moderation model investigating the moderating affect of the quality of the mother-daughter relationship between mothers’ gender ideology and daughters’ gender ideology and objectified body consciousness was also examined. Overall, these models appear to be poor fits for the data. Interestingly, there were significant direct effects for both mothers’ gender ideology on daughters’ perceptions of mother’s objectified body consciousness, as well as daughters’ gender ideology on daughters’ objectified body consciousness, as hypothesized. Whereas most of the significant correlations were in the expected directions, there were not as many significant correlations as originally hypothesized.^

Subject Area

Social psychology|Gender studies

Recommended Citation

Sherd, Lindsey W, "Like mother, like daughter? Perceived gender ideology and objectified body consciousness within the mother-daughter relationship" (2017). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI10255965.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI10255965

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