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The War Never Ends: A Composition for Large Jazz Ensemble in Three Movements

Derek James Molacek, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

“The War Never Ends” is a three-movement programmatic suite for large jazz ensemble plus additional instruments, dedicated to the military service personnel who suffer from Post- Traumatic Stress Disorder. The piece is comprised of three movements: I. “The Call to Serve”; II. “The Call to War”; and III. “The Call for Peace.” Each movement tells a different part of a story of a person who has signed up for military service.^ “The Call to Serve” serves as the beginning to our service member’s journey; from recruitment, to training, to assignment. “The Call to War” illustrates deployment: Specifically, deployment to the Middle-East. This is shown in the use of the ad’han and other elements of eastern musical writing over a jazz-rock groove. “The Call for Peace” represents the return from deployment as the service member struggles to adjust to civilian life, and continues to re-live his experiences from deployment before ultimately taking his own live.^ As a whole, the work represents the experiences of one particular service member from recruitment, to training, to deployment, to coming home and unfortunately to re-live the experiences of the deployment and face new demons entirely. It is my hope that this work will help to raise awareness of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder faced by veterans every day.^

Subject Area

Music

Recommended Citation

Molacek, Derek James, "The War Never Ends: A Composition for Large Jazz Ensemble in Three Movements" (2017). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI10271871.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI10271871

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