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origenes de la literatura grafica: El comic Hispano y peninsular, instrumento de disidencia, critica social, memoria historica e instrumento pedagogico

Alexis R Jimenez Candia, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

The purpose of this dissertation is to explore the origin and history of the literature of comics in its main production sites in Latin America and Spain. This is done by means of a detailed historical tracking of the first traces of the use of graphics and artistic visual expressions to the modern development of comics today. In addition, this project focuses its study on establishing the guidelines that allow one to identify and verify comics as literature. Equally, this study presents reasons why comics are a great didactic tool both for literary and linguistic purposes. Later, it studies how comics have been used as an instrument of dissidence, denunciation, social criticism, political criticism, ideological-political promotion, and historical memory in XX-XXI century. For this, the illustrative production of Guillo, Hervi, Quino, Los Montoneros, Oestherheld, and Brieva is analyzed semiotically demonstrating the complexity and versatility of this type of literature. Finally, didactic projects are presented with the purpose of including comics in literary and linguistic pedagogy using the illustrative work of Daza and Pulido.^

Subject Area

Latin American literature|Literature

Recommended Citation

Jimenez Candia, Alexis R, "origenes de la literatura grafica: El comic Hispano y peninsular, instrumento de disidencia, critica social, memoria historica e instrumento pedagogico" (2018). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI10791976.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI10791976

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