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Therapeutic effects of MMPI-2 feedback favorability on client subjective well -being: A process and outcome study

Carey A Pawlowski, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of Test Interpretation (TI) feedback favorability on client subjective well-being. Thirty-two clients seeking or receiving treatment at a university counseling center served as participants. After completing the MMPI-2, one treatment group received negative-only TI feedback, and the other treatment group received mixed (both negative and positive) TI feedback about their MMPI-2 results. It was hypothesized that clients who received mixed TI feedback (relative to participants who received negative-only TI feedback) would report (1) increased hope, increased self-esteem, decreased level of symptomology, and higher session helpfulness on the outcome measures as well as (2) higher ratings on counselor and session process measures. Results indicated that clients who received mixed TI feedback reported higher ratings on the Counselor Rating Form (CRF), a session process measure involving perceptions of counselor influence (univariate F[1, 30] = 5.620, p < .05; eta2 = .158). Additionally, a significant main effect was found for two of the three CRF subscales (Attractiveness and Trustworthiness), univariate F(1, 30) = 4.487, p < .05, eta 2 = .130; and F(1, 30) = 6.271, p < .05, eta 2 = .173 respectively. Implications for interpreting clients' test results and for future research on this topic are discussed. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Pawlowski, Carey A, "Therapeutic effects of MMPI-2 feedback favorability on client subjective well -being: A process and outcome study" (2002). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI3064569.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI3064569

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