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Behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge toward smoking sheesha among selected students in a teacher certificate program in Kuwait

Heyam Reda Ali Mohammed, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

This is the first known study of sheesha smoking among future teachers in Kuwait. A draft questionnaire was discussed with future teachers and revised based on their recommendations. The final questionnaire was completed by 761 students—261 males (34.3%) and 500 females (65.6%). Of the males, 66% had tried sheesha smoking as had 30.6% of the females. Twenty-five percent of the males had smoked sheesha for at least a month as had 5.5% of the females. Sheesha smokers reported they were first encouraged to smoke sheesha by a friend (42%), smoked one bowl or more a day (42.3%), smoked in the home more than any other place (96.4%), and lived in homes with 2 or more sheesha smokers (52%). Almost half of the sheesha smokers expressed a desire to quit. Female sheesha smokers were more likely to have friends who accepted sheesha smoking than were males. Sheesha smokers were more likely to also smoke cigarettes than non-sheesha-smokers. A 7-item belief scale and an 8-item attitude scale clearly distinguished sheesha smokers and non-sheesha-smokers. The results are discussed in terms of ways to improve the measures used, replicate the results, and develop educational programs. ^

Subject Area

Health Sciences, Public Health|Education, Health

Recommended Citation

Mohammed, Heyam Reda Ali, "Behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge toward smoking sheesha among selected students in a teacher certificate program in Kuwait" (2003). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI3092575.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI3092575

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