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Adolescent social anxiety and co-occurring alcohol use: The moderating role of discrete coping styles

Robert Joseph Smith, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

This study examined the potentially unique moderating role of discrete coping styles on the co-occurrence of social anxiety and alcohol use among adolescents. Participants included 304 adolescents (122 males and 182 females), who were recruited through two separate public school systems. To participate in this study, adolescents completed the Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children (SPAI-C), the Adolescent Alcohol Involvement Scale (AAIS), and the COPE during one regularly scheduled class period. Based on their SPAI-C and AAIS scores, adolescents were classified into one of four symptom groups (comparison, socially anxious, alcohol using, and comorbid). Group differences, with respect to the use of both broad-based constructs of coping (problem-focused and emotion-focused) and discrete styles of coping as measured by the COPE, were investigated. ^ Results offered mixed support for the moderating role of coping styles in the co-occurrence of social anxiety and alcohol use. Prevalence data regarding the co-occurrence of social anxiety and alcohol use appeared to equal or surpass previous rates found with clinical samples of adolescents. With respect to coping, the present findings suggested that the broad-based constructs of problem-focused and emotion-focused coping may not be particularly useful when considering specific disorders such as social anxiety and/or alcohol use. Significant differences emerged, however, among discrete styles of coping which are deserving of continued attention, but these differences were not significantly impacted by developmental time period. These findings are discussed in terms of their impact on the assessment and treatment of youth presenting with both social anxiety and co-occurring alcohol use. ^

Subject Area

Health Sciences, Public Health|Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Smith, Robert Joseph, "Adolescent social anxiety and co-occurring alcohol use: The moderating role of discrete coping styles" (2003). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI3092598.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI3092598

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