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Jewish /Christian conflict and Origen's use of the Christian Testimonia proof text tradition

Mark Nispel, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

This dissertation investigates the development of the Christian tradition of using passages from the Jewish Hebrew scriptures to express and define the Christian faith, the interaction of this tradition with Jewish/Christian social relationships in the first, second, and third centuries, and finally, Origen of Alexandria's interaction with this testimonia tradition. The early Christian use of the Jewish scriptures to express and define their faith is an important element of continuity in the early history of Christianity. For the historian, this tradition can then serve as a point of reference for other issues of interest. In this dissertation I have used the issue of Jewish/Christian social relationships as such an issue, not only because it is of such interest in and of itself but because this relationship exerted significant influence upon the development of the tradition itself. In order for this reference technique to be successful the development of the tradition itself must be understood. This development is discussed for the second and third centuries. In the second century a variety of Christian authors and existing scholarship is examined. Finally, in the third century, Origen of Alexandria is used as an important mile post by which to measure the tradition as he experienced, used, and influenced it. ^

Subject Area

History, Ancient

Recommended Citation

Nispel, Mark, "Jewish /Christian conflict and Origen's use of the Christian Testimonia proof text tradition" (2003). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI3116597.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI3116597

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