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Testing the relationships between personality, motivation, leadership and process to success of self -directed work teams

Susan Neill Williams, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

This study examined the relationships between personality, motivation, leadership and process with success of work groups. Data was collected from 365 persons who were members of 83 work groups in seven north central land grant universities. ^ The analysis of data was conducted in two steps. The first step was to scan all of the variables using correlations and regressions. The second step was to test the self-directed work group model by using stepwise regression analysis on the significant variables. ^ Individuals were asked to self report team success to provide an insider's perspective and a multi-person assessment of the group's accomplishments. Transformational Leadership as measured by the MLQ was found to have a significant relationship with work group success. Fourteen percent of the variance of success for a work group was accounted for in its relationship with transformational leadership. Personality as measured by the NEOFFI was found to be significantly related to success. Extraversion was the significant variable in the personality scale. Five percent of the variance of success for the work groups was accounted for by personality. Process was measured by using the ROCI I and ROCI II and cohesiveness was self identified by the team members. Dominating and cohesiveness were found to be significant process variables and accounted for 30 percent of the variance of success for the work group. Other variables that were significant to work group success included goal clarity, training and demand of task. Several variables were found to not significantly impact the success of work groups—motivation, age, gender, education, job appointment and location, team size, membership time together and organizational support. ^ Work groups are complex open systems; therefore, it is difficult to identify all of the variables related to success. This study identified variables that represented 53% of the variance of success, providing information important to organizational support and training to enhance group performance. ^

Subject Area

Business Administration, Management|Education, Higher

Recommended Citation

Susan Neill Williams, "Testing the relationships between personality, motivation, leadership and process to success of self -directed work teams" (January 1, 2005). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Paper AAI3186888.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI3186888

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