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The paradox of successful street survival: Non-conventional masteries as influencing motivations among runaways

Todd William Greene, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

Traditionally the Stress Process paradigm has conceptualized mastery and social support in purely conventional terms. Meanwhile, some criminological research suggests that deviant behaviors are influenced by non-conventional types of mastery and/or support networks. This study proposes the integration of non-conventional stress moderators into the Stress Process. The idea of non-conventional mastery guides investigations into important phenomena that have often been overlooked by runaway research. According to the SHARE sample, only 50% of homeless and runaway youth are strongly motivated to get off of the streets. Logistic regressions suggest that having non-conventional "street masteries" influences motivations to stay on the streets. The youth who are most adept at street survival appear to be less motivated to leave street life behind them. Factors that impede the development or application street masteries, such as having learning disabilities, being hungry, tired or unrelaxed, or adhering to conventional values, are conversely associated with stronger motivations to get off of the streets. Implications for the Stress Process paradigm, runaway research, and runaway policy are discussed.^

Subject Area

Social Work|Sociology, Criminology and Penology|Sociology, Public and Social Welfare

Recommended Citation

Greene, Todd William, "The paradox of successful street survival: Non-conventional masteries as influencing motivations among runaways" (2007). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI3251358.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI3251358

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