Off-campus UNL users: To download campus access dissertations, please use the following link to log into our proxy server with your NU ID and password. When you are done browsing please remember to return to this page and log out.

Non-UNL users: Please talk to your librarian about requesting this dissertation through interlibrary loan.

Managing privacy boundaries between parents and young-adult children: An examination of the relationship between cultural orientation, family communication, family satisfaction, and parental intrusion

Ana M Cruz, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

Family privacy, communication, and culture are explored in this study. Specifically the study investigated whether cultural orientation moderates the relationship between parental intrusion, family communication, and family satisfaction. Communication Privacy Management was the theoretical framework used in this study, and cultural orientation was addressed using the construct of collectivism and individualism. ^ A total of 245 college students completed a survey to measure family privacy, family communication, family satisfaction, and cultural orientation. Colleges from Nebraska, Texas, and Florida were sampled in this study to obtain participants who represented diverse cultural orientations. ^ Two sets of hypotheses were tested in the study. The first focused on family satisfaction and the second focused on parental intrusion and family communication. Eight regression analyses were conducted. The first four regressions included a cultural dimension as a moderating variable, parental intrusion as the independent variable, and family communication as the dependent variable. The last four regressions included a cultural dimension as a moderating variable, parental intrusion as the independent variable, and family satisfaction as the dependent variable. ^ Results found that cultural orientation did not moderate the relationship between family communication and family satisfaction. However, main effects were found for cultural orientation and parental intrusion. A positive relationship was found between the horizontal-vertical collectivism cultural orientation and family satisfaction as well as family communication. A negative relationship was found between parental intrusion, family satisfaction, and family communication when the cultural orientation was collectivism (both horizontal and vertical dimensions) as well as individualism (both horizontal and vertical). The results of the study supported Petronio’s Communication Privacy Management theory that suggests that privacy intrusion negatively affects the parent-child relationship. Several communication implications are also provided to help parents improve their relationships with their young-adult children. Finally, limitations of the study were discussed. ^

Subject Area

Speech Communication|Sociology, Individual and Family Studies

Recommended Citation

Cruz, Ana M, "Managing privacy boundaries between parents and young-adult children: An examination of the relationship between cultural orientation, family communication, family satisfaction, and parental intrusion" (2007). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI3293919.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI3293919

Share

COinS