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An evaluation of Clark and Watson's tripartite model in a sample of community adolescents

Emily R Anderson, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

Clark and Watson (1991) proposed a tripartite model to explain the observed overlap between anxiety and depressive symptoms, as well as to explain high comorbidity rates between the two diagnostic categories. Recent evidence, however, suggests that the model may not be applicable across anxiety disorders. The purpose of the current study is to examine the applicability of the tripartite model in a community sample of adolescents, some who exhibit symptoms of social anxiety and Social Phobia. One hundred and seventy adolescents participated in the present study. In an initial appointment, adolescent/parent dyads completed the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV: Child Version to determine diagnostic status, and completed the following self-report measures: the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, Revised Children’s Manifest Anxiety Scale, Children’s Depression Inventory, Social Anxiety Scale for Adolescents, and Social Phobia and Anxiety Inventory for Children. In a second appointment, adolescents gave an impromptu speech, before and during which heart rate was monitored, and then completed the Beck Anxiety Inventory. Between-groups analyses indicated that low positive affect, high negative affect, and high physiological hyperarousal all were characteristic of social phobia. Correlational analyses indicated that social anxiety symptoms were significantly negatively associated with positive affect, but significantly positively associated with negative affect and physiological hyperarousal. Multiple regression analyses revealed that negative affect was the only significant predictor of social anxiety symptomatology. Discriminant function analyses indicated that a function with low positive affect, high negative affect, and high physiological hyperarousal best differentiated the groups (i.e., nonanxious, socially anxious, and social phobic). When analyses were run again separately based on gender, results indicated that the tripartite constructs show differential correlations based on gender, and that the tripartite predictors work better for girls than for boys. Results partially supported both Clark and Watson’s original model as well as research questioning the original model. Thus, a revised version of the tripartite model with regard to assessment in social phobia is supported and discussed. ^

Subject Area

Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Anderson, Emily R, "An evaluation of Clark and Watson's tripartite model in a sample of community adolescents" (2007). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI3321125.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI3321125

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