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Critical incident stress debriefing and the effect of timing of intervention on first responders: A preliminary study

Robin R Chang, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

This study evaluated the impact of timing of Critical Incident Stress Debriefing (CISD) on symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and supplementary outcome measures of posttrauma adaptation: psychological distress and alcohol consumption. Hypotheses were that delayed debriefings were superior to immediate debriefings in reducing symptoms across these measures. The sample was a mixed professional group of first responders exposed to a critical incident who (N = 89) completed self-report measures both immediately before debriefing and approximately 3 months later. Results did not support the hypothesized impact of timing. Participants endorsed little difficulty on outcome measures. The study suggests general resiliency and that timing of intervention is not a central issue for most first responders. Issues regarding risk/resilience, strict timing guidelines, and alternative strategies fostering recovery are explored as well as implications for future research.^

Subject Area

Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Chang, Robin R, "Critical incident stress debriefing and the effect of timing of intervention on first responders: A preliminary study" (2008). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI3342066.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI3342066

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