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Rational persuasion and attitude change: The impact of perceived leader authenticity and perceived leader ability on target outcomes

Ketan H Mhatre, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

A field sample of 221 working adults was used to test the impact of perceived leader authenticity and perceived leader ability on the success of the influence tactic of leader rational persuasion aimed at generating an attitude shift in target audience. Written scenarios were use to portray a fictitious leader as either high or low along the continuums of perceived authenticity and perceived ability and the subsequent impact of the leader’s rational persuasion attempt was assessed across outcomes of attitude change in targets, emergence of trust in leader, targets’ organizational advocacy, and targets’ willingness to invest in the leader’s organization. Results indicated that perceptions of leader authenticity as well as leader ability had a positive impact on attitude change in targets. Additionally, a significant interaction between perceptions of leader authenticity and perceptions of leader ability was found across the outcome of targets’ trust in the leader. Lastly, trust in leader was found to mediate the relationship between perceptions of leader authenticity and leader ability and outcomes of organizational advocacy and decision to invest in the leader’s organization. ^

Subject Area

Business Administration, Management

Recommended Citation

Mhatre, Ketan H, "Rational persuasion and attitude change: The impact of perceived leader authenticity and perceived leader ability on target outcomes" (2009). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI3355629.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI3355629

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