Off-campus UNL users: To download campus access dissertations, please use the following link to log into our proxy server with your NU ID and password. When you are done browsing please remember to return to this page and log out.

Non-UNL users: Please talk to your librarian about requesting this dissertation through interlibrary loan.

Depression and diabetes comorbidity: psychotherapy treatment preferences among a predominantly mexican sample of primary care patients with diabetes

Maria Jose Herrera, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

Depression and diabetes are highly comorbid problems yet their conjoint treatment, particularly the use of evidence based psychological treatments among diabetics, warrants further research. Specifically, little is known about the treatment of depression among diabetic Latinos, one of the fastest growing populations with comorbid depression and diabetes. Because of this scarce research among Latino diabetics, the present study aims to test whether educating Latino diabetics about treatment options for depression would differentiate their choice of one treatment over the other. Secondary aims were to investigate the degree to which cultural, depression, and diabetic factors differentiated treatment choice. Thirty two participants were provided with brief treatment rationale scripts on three empirically supportive treatments for major depression (e.g., cognitive therapy, behavioral activation, interpersonal therapy). After rationales were presented, participants were asked to choose their preferred treatment to treat depression. Results showed that participants preferred all treatments over cognitive therapy and that cultural variables were related to treatment rationale selection.^

Subject Area

Psychology, Clinical

Recommended Citation

Herrera, Maria Jose, "Depression and diabetes comorbidity: psychotherapy treatment preferences among a predominantly mexican sample of primary care patients with diabetes" (2013). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI3589762.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI3589762

Share

COinS