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Reasons underlying adults', 50 years of age and older, decisions to engage, or not engage in exercise programs when referred by their health care provider

Jeannie Marie Hannan, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

Exercise may be just as important as medication in the treatment and prevention of morbidity (Naci & Loannidis, 2013). However, the majority of older adults do not achieve the recommended amount of exercise (Centers for Disease Control: Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, 2011b; Nelson, et al., 2007).^ Drawing on the Self-Determination Theory developed by Deci & Ryan (Ryan & Deci, 2002), this study sought to determine reasons underlying adults', 50 years of age and older, decisions to engage, or not engage in exercise programs when referred by their health care provider. A quantitative study was performed to test the hypotheses using patients, 50 years and older, referred by their health care provider to Exercise is Medicine® provider referral programs in Nebraska and North Carolina. These programs were developed in response to the national Exercise is Medicine ® initiative launched in 2007 by the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Medical Association (Dickey & Turner, 2007). ^ Participants (n=214) completed the Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire (BREQ-2) to determine their motivation to participate in a free two-week exercise program and their motivation to continue after the trial. Results of logistic regression analyses showed that older adults who were intrinsically regulated were more likely to participate in the Exercise is Medicine® free two-week trial when referred by their health care provider than those with any other form of regulation. In addition, those with identified regulation were more likely to continue the program after the two-week trial. Results suggest that health care providers and fitness professionals may benefit from understanding motives and barriers for older adults' participation in exercise programs.^

Subject Area

Gerontology

Recommended Citation

Hannan, Jeannie Marie, "Reasons underlying adults', 50 years of age and older, decisions to engage, or not engage in exercise programs when referred by their health care provider" (2013). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI3604643.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI3604643

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