Off-campus UNL users: To download campus access dissertations, please use the following link to log into our proxy server with your NU ID and password. When you are done browsing please remember to return to this page and log out.

Non-UNL users: Please talk to your librarian about requesting this dissertation through interlibrary loan.

Principal leadership in high-performing, high-poverty elementary schools

Marc J Cohen, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

The focus of this mixed methods study was on Maryland Title I elementary principals who led schools to achieving adequate yearly progress during the 2011-2012 school year. At the time of the study, slightly more than one third of the Title I elementary schools in Maryland and throughout the U.S., achieved this status (U.S. Department of Education, 2013). ^ In-depth interviews were conducted with twenty-five principals from Title elementary schools in Maryland. The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) Leader Form was administered to the participants as well. ^ This study findings indicated, 1. Principals of high-performing, high-poverty elementary schools were more transformational in their leadership behaviors than they were transactional or passive avoidant. ^ 2. Principals of high-performing, high-poverty elementary schools shared leadership and created opportunities for professional collaboration. ^ 3. Principals of high-performing, high-poverty elementary schools encouraged strategic thinking and planning to achieve school goals. ^ 4. Principals of high-performing, high-poverty elementary schools viewed themselves as trainers and developers who built others’ capacity to do the work. ^ 5. Principals of high-performing, high-poverty elementary schools created open, risk-free, trusting professional environments. ^ 6. Principals of high-performing, high-poverty elementary schools had a clearly defined, articulated, and shared vision categorized by high expectations. ^ 7. Principals of high-performing, high-poverty elementary schools sought ways to engage parents and the community in the work of the school.^

Subject Area

Educational leadership|Educational administration|Elementary education

Recommended Citation

Cohen, Marc J, "Principal leadership in high-performing, high-poverty elementary schools" (2015). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI3732070.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI3732070

Share

COinS