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Exploring the Developmental Niche of Internationally Mobile Families: A Mixed Methods Study of Settings, Customs, and Parent Beliefs Regarding Children's Education

Jennifer G DeLeon, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

The increasing interest in culture and growing mobility of individuals and ideas have raised awareness of families who move temporarily to places around the globe. This study explored the educational developmental niche of families from the United States who were temporarily living overseas. Parents from the United States were asked to complete an online survey with quantitative and qualitative questions regarding the educational setting, customs, ethnotheories, parent perceptions of the child about education, and general demographics. The children were mostly in international schools and home schools and parents were predominantly employed in religious/missionary occupations. Parent responses indicated overall satisfaction with their children’s educational settings, continued connections with the United States, ties within the expatriate community, impact of factors on educational choices, and children’s overall agreement. Themes emerged in goals and customs described by parents, the influence of religion/spirituality, and influences of others. Results are presented within the framework of the developmental niche. Significance and implications for those who work with and support internationally mobile families are discussed. ^

Subject Area

Social research|Education|Individual & family studies

Recommended Citation

DeLeon, Jennifer G, "Exploring the Developmental Niche of Internationally Mobile Families: A Mixed Methods Study of Settings, Customs, and Parent Beliefs Regarding Children's Education" (2015). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI3738961.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI3738961

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