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Utilization of feed resources to enhance efficiency of feedlot cattle

Tony L Scott, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

Three finishing trials were conducted to evaluate the effects of programmed gain feeding systems on performance, carcass characteristics, and profitability of finishing cattle. Programmed gain finishing systems reduced both dry matter intake and daily gain and did not improve feed efficiency. Likewise, programmed gain feeding systems did not improve carcass characteristics or net return per animal compared to allowing animals ad libitum access to feed throughout the feeding period. These data indicate that utilization of programmed gain finishing systems did not result in improvements in performance, carcass characteristics, or profitability of finishing cattle when compared to traditional ad libitum feeding systems. In addition, four finishing trials were conducted to determine the effects of corn processing method in finishing diets containing wet corn gluten feed on performance and carcass characteristics. When directly comparing finishing diets with and without wet corn gluten feed, feeding steam-flaked corn improved efficiency and dietary net energy available for gain while decreasing cost of gain compared to dry-rolled corn regardless of wet corn gluten feed inclusion. Similarly, in finishing diets containing wet corn gluten feed and comparing grain processing method, feed efficiency and dietary net energy available for gain tended to improve while cost of gain tended to decrease with increasing intensity of grain processing method. When compared to feeding dry-rolled corn, feeding steam-flaked corn improved efficiency 8.5% while feeding high-moisture corn resulted in a smaller improvement (3.4%) when averaged across trials. A smaller improvement in feed efficiency was observed for finely-ground corn when compared to feeding dry-rolled corn. Feeding finely-rolled corn resulted in a slight decrease in efficiency compared to dry-rolled corn. Feeding unprocessed or whole corn reduced efficiency and net energy available for gain while increasing cost of gain compared to steam-flaking, high-moisture ensiling, finely-grinding, or dry-rolling corn grain. These data indicate that in diets containing wet corn gluten feed, increasing the intensity of grain processing tends to improve feed efficiency. ^

Subject Area

Agriculture, Animal Culture and Nutrition

Recommended Citation

Scott, Tony L, "Utilization of feed resources to enhance efficiency of feedlot cattle" (2000). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI9992008.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI9992008

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