Off-campus UNL users: To download campus access dissertations, please use the following link to log into our proxy server with your NU ID and password. When you are done browsing please remember to return to this page and log out.

Non-UNL users: Please talk to your librarian about requesting this dissertation through interlibrary loan.

The relationship between preschool children's emergent literacy status and home literacy activities

Zhi George Zhou, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

The research study was based on the 1993 National Household Education Survey on school readiness. Representing the national population composition, parents or guardians of 4,423 preschool-age children participate in the survey. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between children's emergent literacy achievement and their home literacy activities. Specifically, the research attempted to (1) identify some “global” home activities that may contribute to children's literacy development; (2) describe the relationship between these activities and literacy; and (3) examine the unique contribution these home literacy activities may make to children's literacy growth. ^ Home direct literacy activities such as reading to children, telling them stories, and teaching them letters, words, or letters were found positively related to children's literacy achievement. Each of these activities made a significant contribution to children's emergent literacy development beyond and above children's age, mother's education, household income, television viewing time, preschool attendance, and parent belief. ^ Some home indirect literacy activities showed a significant relationship with children's literacy status. They also made significant contributions to children's emergent literacy development when children's age, mother's education, household income, television viewing time, preschool attendance, and parent belief were controlled. These activities include doing arts and crafts; teaching children music or songs; doing household chores; visiting a library; visiting an art gallery, museum, or historical site; talking about family history or ethnic heritage; and involving children into community or religious events. ^

Subject Area

Education, Early Childhood|Sociology, Individual and Family Studies

Recommended Citation

Zhou, Zhi George, "The relationship between preschool children's emergent literacy status and home literacy activities" (2000). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI9992016.
http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI9992016

Share

COinS