Extension

 

Date of this Version

1974

Comments

© 1974, The Board of Regents of the University of Nebraska on behalf of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension. All rights reserved.

Abstract

Arriving at fair and equitable prices for silage requires judgment and attention to detail.

Arriving at fair and equitable prices for silage requires judgment and attention to detail. The amount of grain and moisture contained have major influences on its feed value, and can be used to increase the accuracy of silage pricing.

Grain usually comprises 50 to 55 percent of the dry matter and produces 65 to 70 percent of the protein and energy value in corn varieties selected for grain production. On the other hand, silage varieties are more variable, with some having considerably lower grain yields and percentages of grain dry matter. Because of this, using grain production per acre or estimated percentage of grain in the harvested crop as a base for determining the value of the crop can contribute to a fair and equitable price.

Grain yields appear to be a less reliable base for pricing forage sorghums. A greater variation in grain-to-forage content and perhaps more lignin in some varieties complicates pricing sorghum on the basis of grain yield or content.