Extension

 

Date of this Version

1994

Comments

© 1994, The Board of Regents of the University of Nebraska on behalf of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension. All rights reserved.

Abstract

Jams, jellies and preserves are foods with many textures, flavors, and colors. They all consist of fruits preserved mostly by means of sugar and they are thickened or jellied to some extent.

Fruit jelly is a semi-solid mixture of fruit juice and sugar that is clear and firm enough to hold its shape.

Jam also will hold its shape, but it is less firm than jelly. Jam is made from crushed or chopped fruits and sugar. Jams made from a mixture of fruits are usually called conserves, especially when they include citrus fruits, nuts, raisins, or coconut.

Preserves are made of small, whole fruits, or uniform-size pieces of fruits in a clear, thick, slightly jellied syrup.

Marmalades are soft fruit jellies with small pieces of fruit or citrus peel evenly suspended in a transparent jelly.

Fruit butters are made from fruit pulp cooked with sugar until thickened to a spreadable consistency.