Agriculture and Natural Resources, Institute of (IANR)

 

Date of this Version

1925

Document Type

Article

Citation

Published in THESE FIFTY YEARS: A HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA (Lincoln, 1925).

Abstract

THE fifteen-year period from about 1875 to 1890 was marked by at least three important developments in the history of the College of Agriculture. One was the changing of the name of the Agricultural College to that of Industrial College and the consequent development of an engineering department within the Industrial College, as well as the reorganization of the work of the college. The second was the founding of the Agricultural Experiment Station with government funds supplied under the Hatch Act. The third important development was the erection of Nebraska Hall, a building to house the Industrial College, on the uptown campus of the University.

At the beginning of this period the Agricultural College was in operation but certainly in none too prosperous a condition. Its biggest attraction still remained the free rooms in the "dormitory" and the labor supplied students on the farm. There were two buildings of consequence at the farm, one the little stone house that was on the property when it was purchased by the University and the other the large frame house, erected in 1875, which was torn down in the fall of 1923.

"At the farm house he [a student] can find a pleasant home, far enough from the city to be out of the way of its temptations to idleness and worse, and yet near enough to enjoy all its literary and public advantages," reads the catalog printed in 1875. "With all of the advantages of quiet and retirement for study, the student has yet the opportunity to be part of a young and growing university."