USDA Forest Service -- National Agroforestry Center

 

Date of this Version

1982

Comments

Published in TRANSACTIONS OF THE FORTY-SEVENTH NORTH AMERICAN WILDLIFE AND NATURAL RESOURCES CONFERENCE, ed. Kenneth Sabol (Washington, DC, 1982).

Abstract

Riparian microhabitats in coniferous forests in northeastern Oregon are sensitive to alteration. They have been used disproportionately by people, livestock, and wildlife. These uses have altered the habitats, specifically by reducing vegetative structure (Thomas 1979).
Land management agencies are revegetating depleted riparian zones to improve fish and wildlife habitat. Managers need information on the response of birds to kinds and structures of vegetation so that wildlife objectives can be met.
Several studies have dealt with the relationships of riparian vegetation and avifauna (Carothers and Johnson 1975, Ferguson et al. 1976, Stauffer 1978). Although these studies determined some of the habitat requirements of avian species and the consequences of habitat alteration, we need information on the relationship between occurrences of birds and structural components of riparian habitats.
The objectives of this study were to compare habitat use by birds with available riparian habitat, and to compare bird population characteristics among riparian habitats with different amounts of deciduous vegetation-high, moderate, and low.

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