USDA Forest Service -- National Agroforestry Center

 

Date of this Version

1982

Comments

Published in TRANSACTIONS OF THE FORTY-SEVENTH NORTH AMERICAN WILDLIFE AND NATURAL RESOURCES CONFERENCE, ed. Kenneth Sabol (Washington, DC, 1982).

Abstract

For many years prior to 1969, wildlife was essentially defined, in the practice of governmental bodies, as those species hunted for sport, trapped for furs, controlled to accomplish human objectives, or of particular aesthetic value. Governmental management of these species was based on funding obtained from or supported largely by clearly identified constituencies.
Universities evolved specialized programs in wildlife biology and management to produce the knowledge and trained professionals to meet these needs. Many such programs were oriented to training in zoology which emphasized the animal and populations while paying less attention to habitat.
As a result, most wildlife research was focused on a few species, and was directed to their taxonomy, population level and dynamics, life history, behavior, distribution, and food habits. Comparatively little effort was spent on defining habitat requirements of even these select species. And, little attention was given to the study, welfare, and management of other species.

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