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Authors

J. Overland, NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, Seattle, WA
J. Walsh, International Arctic Research Center, Fairbanks, AK
M. Wang, Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
J. Richter-Menge, ERDC-Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, Hanover, NH
J. Comiso, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland
W. Meier, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado
S. Nghiem, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA
D. Perovich, ERDC-Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, Hanover, NH
A. Proshutinsky, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Woods Hole, MA
J. Morison, Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
I. Ashik, Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia
E. Carmack, Institute of Ocean Sciences, Sidney, Canada
I. Frolov, Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia
J. C. Gascard, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France
M. Itoh, Institute of Observational Research for Global Change, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka, Japan
R. Krishfield, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Woods Hole, MA
F. McLaughlin, Institute of Ocean Sciences, Sidney, Canada
I . Polyakov, International Arctic Research Center, Fairbanks, Alaska
B. Rudels, Finnish Institute of Marine Research, Helsinki, Finland
U. Schauer, Alfred-Wegener-Institut für Polar- und Meeresforschung, Bremer-haven, Germany
K . Shimada, Institute of Observational Research for Global Change, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka, Japan
V. Sokolov, Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia
M. Steele, Polar Science Center, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
M.-L. Timmermans, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Woods Hole, MA
J. Toole, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Woods Hole, MA
V. Romanovsky, Geophyiscal Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK
R. Armstrong, CIRES/NSIDC, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO
A. Shiklomanov, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH
D. Walker, Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska–Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska
G. Jia, RCE/TEA, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, China
J. Box, Byrd Polar Research Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
J. Cappelen, Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark
D. Bromwich, Byrd Polar Research Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
L.-S. Bai, Byrd Polar Research Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
T. Mote, Department of Geography, University of Georgia, Atlanta, Georgia
B. Veenhuis, Department of Meteorology, The Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida
N. Mikkelsen, Geologic Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Copenhagen, Denmark
A. Weidick, Geologic Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Copenhagen, Denmark
Michael Svoboda, Ecological Monitoring Program Coordinator, Environment Canada, Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada
D. Russell, Scientist Emeritus, Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada, Yukon, Canada
M.J.J.E. Loonen, University of Groningen, Arctic Centre
C. Zöckler, UNEP-WCMC, Cambridge
B. Ebbinge, Alterra, Wageningen
M. Simpkins, U.S. Marine Mammal Commission
C.D. Sawatzky, Freshwater Institute, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Winnipeg, MB
J.D. Reist, Freshwater Institute, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Winnipeg, MB

Date of this Version

10-2008

Comments

Arctic Report Card 2008, http://www.arctic.noaa.gov/reportcard

Abstract

There continues to be widespread and, in some cases, dramatic evidence of an overall warming of the Arctic system.

Atmosphere: 5° C temperature increases were recorded in autumn

Ocean: Observed increase in temperature of surface and deep ocean layers

Sea Ice: Near-record minimum summer sea ice extent

Greenland: Records set in both duration and extent of summer surface melt

Biology: Fisheries and marine mammals impacted by loss of sea ice

Land: Permafrost temperatures tend to increase, while snow extent tends to decrease The Arctic Report Card is introduced as a means of presenting clear, reliable and concise information on recent observations of environmental conditions in the Arctic, relative to historical time series records. Issued annually, it provides a method of updating and expanding the content of the State of the Arctic Report, published in fall 2006, to reflect current conditions. Some of the essays are based upon articles in the BAMS State of the Climate in 2007.

Material presented in the Report Card is prepared by an international team of scientists and is peer-reviewed by topical experts of the Climate Experts Group (AMAP) of the Arctic Council. The audience for the Arctic Report Card is wide, including scientists, students, teachers, decision makers and the general public interested in Arctic environment and science. The web-based format will facilitate future timely updates of the content.

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