Agricultural Leadership, Education, and Communication, Department of

 

Date of this Version

Summer 7-30-2010

Comments

A THESIS Presented to the Faculty of The Graduate College at the University of Nebraska In Partial Fulfillment of Requirements For the Degree of Master of Science, Major: Leadership Education, Under the Supervision of Professor Gina S. Matkin. Lincoln, Nebraska: August, 2010
Copyright 2010 Cyndi A. Munson

Abstract

The purpose of this qualitative, interview-based study was to explore the leadership experiences of adolescent girls attending low income schools involved in a Girl Scouts after school program. This research study specifically focused on a Girl Scouts after school programs in a Midwest city. The qualitative study was based on insights obtained from adolescent girls who participated in a Girl Scouts after school program during the 2009-2010 academic year. Participants were individuals actively involved in a Girl Scouts after school program and supplemental activities provided by the program since August 2009. The participants’ ages and grade levels varied between 12 and 15 years of age and 6th and 9th grades for the 2009-2010 academic year. Participants were asked about their experiences in a Girl Scouts after school program through semi-structured, face to face interviews. These interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Each participant’s experience is described by their self-chosen pseudonym.

To explore the leadership experiences of adolescent girls in a Girl Scouts after school program four research questions were developed for the study: How do girls describe their experiences, activities, and interests before joining this Girl Scouts after school program; How do girls describe their experiences, activities, and interests since joining this Girl Scouts after school program; How do girls describe their leadership philosophies since coming to this Girl Scouts after school program; and How do girls describe how this Girl Scouts after school program has impacted their lives? The study found that the participants describe a positive experience with a Girl Scouts after school program. A Girl Scouts after school program has given each participant insight on leadership, self-awareness, future goals, and involvement. Practitioners who develop after school programs can use the information found in this study to continue creating and providing opportunities for engaging and positive experiences for adolescent girls.

Adviser: Gina S. Matkin

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