Brain, Biology and Behavior, Center for

 

Date of this Version

2013

Document Type

Article

Citation

Published in final edited form as: Dev Neuropsychol. 2013 ; 38(5): 317–336. doi:10.1080/87565641.2013.799169. PMCID: PMC4361951 HHS Public Access

Comments

Copyright 2013 Taylor & Francis.

Abstract

The effect of mild sleep restriction on cognitive functioning in young children is unclear, yet sleep loss may impact children's abilities to attend to tasks with high processing demands. In a preliminary investigation, six children (6.6 - 8.3 years of age) with normal sleep patterns performed three tasks: attention (“Oddball”), speech perception (conconant-vowel syllables) and executive function (Directional Stroop). Event-related potentials (ERP) responses were recorded before (Control) and following one-week of 1-hour per day of sleep restriction. Brain activity across all tasks following Sleep Restriction differed from activity during Control Sleep, indicating that minor sleep restriction impacts children's neurocognitive functioning.