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Understanding Information Technology Acceptance and Effectiveness in College Students' English Learning in China

Aiqing Yu, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

The current research aims to collect facts to reveal an objective and a general understanding about the factors that predict Chinese college students' technology use in learning English and the correlation between the technology use and students' English learning achievement. Based on the research objectives, a quantitative correlational methodological approach is chosen to explore critical factors of technology use behavior of Chinese college students in learning English. The current study adopted the UTAUT model to explore the acceptance of digital technology in English learning by college students in mainland China and adopted the CET4 and CET6 score to demonstrate Chinese college students' English learning performance. Structural Equation Modeling was used in the current research. This research found that Perceived Usefulness and Social Norms predict students' technology use intention. Students' use intentions and Teachers' Technology Use significantly impact students technology use. Teachers' technology use positively correlates with students' English proficiency score in CET4 and CET6. Students autonomous technology use positively correlates students' English proficiency score in CET6. These findings highlighted the importance of technology use in College English teaching and learning.

Subject Area

Foreign language education|Educational technology

Recommended Citation

Yu, Aiqing, "Understanding Information Technology Acceptance and Effectiveness in College Students' English Learning in China" (2019). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI13864538.
https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI13864538

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