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“We’re Black, Too”: A Grounded Theory of African Students’ Intersectional Experiences of Race at Predominantly White Institutions in Nebraska

Eileen Boswell, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

This qualitative study generated an original grounded theory to explain how African-born students at predominantly White institutions (PWIs) in Nebraska experience race and racism(s), and to illuminate the asset frameworks they draw on to navigate college life. The theoretical model generated is one of tensions and contradictions, wherein African students are socialized by third parties, often their same-country peers, through social networks coined herein as counter-knowledge networks. Such networks provide crucial information to African students that is often in contrast or diametrically opposed to the official orientation and onboarding conveyed in institutional messaging and other university materials and communications. Stakeholders for this work include immigrant students from Africa and student affairs personnel working on anti-racism programs in higher education.

Subject Area

Educational sociology|African American Studies

Recommended Citation

Boswell, Eileen, "“We’re Black, Too”: A Grounded Theory of African Students’ Intersectional Experiences of Race at Predominantly White Institutions in Nebraska" (2022). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI29165906.
https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI29165906

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