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Technology Is Not the Problem: A Case Study on Perspectives of Healthcare Providers on Remote Collaborative Mental Health Care in a University Student Health Center

Cassandra Leow Yin May, University of Nebraska - Lincoln

Abstract

University student health centers play an important role in addressing mental health problems among college students as they serve as an ‘entry point’ into receiving healthcare. Adopting a collaborative care approach allows healthcare providers to address complex healthcare needs in college students and provide better quality care due to the exchange of knowledge and expertise among various healthcare providers (Donnelly et al., 2021; Knowles et al., 2015). However, collaboration had to be adapted due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and providers had to adapt to this by collaborating mental health care remotely. While extensive research has been conducted on collaborative care, little research has explored the perspectives of healthcare providers on collaborating remotely, especially in a university student health center population. A multi-method, single-case study approach was adopted to explore the perspectives of healthcare providers on remote collaborative mental health care in a university student health center population. Healthcare providers who collaborated mental health care remotely completed a questionnaire that measured the strength of the collaborative relationship with mental health providers, followed by an interview. Data from the questionnaire was used to complement findings from the interview. Qualitative findings suggest that healthcare providers perceived that (1) there was more collaboration under the same entity, (2) collaboration is challenging when providers are working under separate entities, (3) collaboration is valuable, and that (4) in-person collaboration is preferred but remote collaboration is just as effective. Quantitative results suggest that while collaboration was challenging for healthcare providers, they believed that they were able to continue providing high quality care to patients. Findings from this study shed light on the collaborative care process when providers worked under the same versus separate entities. Further, technology was believed to be just as effective as in-person collaboration and was able to circumvent the challenges from working under separate entities and the COVID-19 pandemic.

Subject Area

Health sciences|Mental health

Recommended Citation

May, Cassandra Leow Yin, "Technology Is Not the Problem: A Case Study on Perspectives of Healthcare Providers on Remote Collaborative Mental Health Care in a University Student Health Center" (2022). ETD collection for University of Nebraska - Lincoln. AAI29323150.
https://digitalcommons.unl.edu/dissertations/AAI29323150

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