Libraries at University of Nebraska-Lincoln

 

Date of this Version

4-1-2020

Citation

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Abstract

The purpose of the survey is to ascertain health science library professionals about their knowledge and skills in professionals development in enhancing their knowledge in day to day their work environment. 218 questionnaire were administered personally and 183 dully filled in questionnaire were received with response rate of 84.94% and were considered for analysis. The study findings that The male professionals in the first three categories are shown as between 70-85% and the highest is in the Pharmacy institutions. The Age group 36-40 has in total 54 (29.51%) of all the professionals taken together. The data reveals that 175 (95.63%) have stated in positive that the participation helps them to update their knowledge and skills. It is found 90.71% professionals attend and participate in the Seminars, conferences and the number of conferences attended during last five years are 78(42.6%) with 1-5 of such meetings and 69(37.7%) for the frequencies 6-10. It has identified two types of changes in health science information environment and they are management and organisational changes which affect the library and its management. It will affect the management of resources – from print to virtual media

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