North American Crane Working Group

 

Date of this Version

2014

Document Type

Article

Citation

From: Aborn, D. A., editor. 2016. Proceedings of the thirteenth North American crane workshop. North American Crane Working Group, Baraboo, Wisconsin, USA.

Comments

© 2016 North American Crane Working Group All rights reserved. Reproduction of material for noncommercial purposes is authorized without permission provided the source is cited.

Abstract

AGE-SPECIFIC SURVIVAL OF GREATER SANDHILL CRANE COLTS IN NEVADA. Chad August, Jim Sedinger, and Chris Nicolai 111

WHOOPING CRANE DISTRIBUTION AND HABITAT USE: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE? Jane Austin, Matthew Hayes, and Jeb Barzen 111

BEHAVIORAL MOVEMENTS OF ARANSAS-WOOD BUFFALO WHOOPING CRANES: ANOMALIES OR INDICATIONS OF WAYS TO FURTHER ENHANCE SPECIES RECOVERY. David Baasch, Mark Bidwell, Wade Harrell, Kris Metzger, Aaron Pearse, and Mary Harner 112

INFLUENCES ON NEST SUCCESS IN A REINTRODUCED POPULATION OF WHOOPING CRANES. Jeb Barzen, Sarah Converse, Peter Adler, Elmer Gray, Anne Lacy, Eva Szyszkoski, and Andrew Gossens 113

DETERMINING DIET COMPOSITION AND INGESTION RATE OF CRANES THROUGH FIELD

MEASUREMENT. Jeb Barzen, Ted Thousand, Julia Welch, Megan Fitzpatrick, Eloise Lachance, and Triet Tran 114

HABITAT USE AND MOVEMENT PATTERNS OF WHOOPING CRANES IN THE OIL SANDS MINING REGION. Mark Bidwell, David Baasch, Dave Brandt, John Conkin, Mary Harner, Wade Harrell, Kris Metzger, Aaron Pearse, and Richard Wiacek 115

CAPTURE AND DEPLOYING GPS PTTS ON ARANSAS-WOOD BUFFALO WHOOPING CRANES: LESSONS LEARNED WITH NEW TECHNIQUES AND TECHNOLOGIES. David Brandt, Aaron Pearse, Barry Hartup, Mark Bidwell, Felipe Chavez-Ramirez, and Bradley Strobel 116

CAN HORMONE METABOLITES PREDICT THE TIMING OF REPRODUCTIVE BEHAVIORS IN THE CAPTIVE WHOOPING CRANE?. Megan Brown, Sarah Converse, Jane Chandler, Carol Keefer, and Nucharin Songssasen 117

BREEDING DISTRIBUTION OF SANDHILL CRANES IN RUSSIA. Inga Bysykatova, Gary Krapu, and David Brandt 117

A REVIEW OF PARENT-REARING WHOOPING CRANES AT PATUXENT WILDLIFE RESEARCH CENTER, 1988-2003.Jane Chandler, Brian Clauss, and Glenn Olsen 118

PREDICTING OUTCOMES OF REINTRODUCTION STRATEGIES IN A DECISION-ANALYTIC SETTING.Sarah Converse, Sabrina Servanty, Patricia Heglund, and Michael Runge 118

MOVEMENT STRATEGIES OF SUBADULT INDIVIDUALS ON WINTER HABITAT INFLUENCE WINTER RANGE EXPANSION OF A MIGRATORY BIRD. Nicole Davis and Elizabeth Smith 119

PEOPLE OF A FEATHER FLOCK TOGETHER: A GLOBAL INITIATIVE TO ADDRESS CRANE AND POWER LINE INTERACTIONS.Megan Diamond, Jim Harris, Claire Mirande, and Jane Austin 120

EVALUATION OF LONGEVITY AND WEAR OF COLORED PLASTIC LEG-BANDS DEPLOYED ON SANDHILL CRANES IN WISCONSIN Katherine Dickerson and Matthew Hayes 120

SURVIVAL OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN SANDHILL CRANE. Roderick Drewien, William Kendall, Wendy Brown, and Brian Gerber 121

THE USE OF SATELLITE TELEMETRY TO EVALUATE MIGRATION CHRONOLOGY AND DISTRIBUTION OF EASTERN POPULATION SANDHILL CRANES. David Fronczak and David Andersen 121

NATIONAL WHOOPING CRANE ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION PROGRAM. Joan Garland and Erica Cochrane 122

THE ROLE OF POPULATIONS AND SUBSPECIES IN SANDHILL CRANE CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT. Brian Gerber and James Dwyer 122

ANNUAL VARIATION OF YOUNG OF THE YEAR IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN POPULATION OF SANDHILL CRANES.Brian Gerber, William Kendall, James Dubovsky, Roderick Drewien, and Mevin Hooten 123

AGE-SPECIFIC MIGRATORY AND FORAGING ECOLOGY OF EASTERN POPULATION GREATER SANDHILL CRANESEverett Hanna and Scott Petrie 124

EVALUATION OF A VACUUM TECHNIQUE TO ESTIMATE ABUNDANCE OF AGRICULTURAL GRAIN. Everett Hanna, Michael Schummer, and Scott Petrie 125

CHARACTERIZATION OF STOPOVER SITES USED BY WHOOPING CRANES AS DETERMINED FROM TELEMETRY-MARKED BIRDS. Mary Harner, Greg Wright, Aaron Pearse, David Baasch, Kris Metzger, Mark Bidwell, and Wade Harrell 126

MESHING NEW INFORMATION FROM THE WHOOPING CRANE TRACKING PARTNERSHIP WITH SPECIES RECOVERY GOALS—NEXT STEPS. Wade Harrell, Mark Bidwell, Aaron Pearse, Kris Metzger, Mary Harner, and David Baasch 127

HEALTH ASSESSMENT OF JUVENILE WHOOPING CRANES IN WOOD BUFFALO NATIONAL PARK. Barry Hartup 127

TERRITORY AVAILABILITY BEST EXPLAINS FIDELITY IN SANDHILL CRANES. Matthew Hayes and Jeb Barzen 128

MISSISSIPPI SANDHILL CRANE CONSERVATION UPDATE 2011-13. Scott Hereford and Angela Dedrickson 128

MIGRATION ROUTES AND WINTERING AREAS OF PACIFIC FLYWAY LESSER SANDHILL CRANES. Gary Ivey 129

A MODEL FOR MITIGATING LOSS OF CRANES FROM POWER LINE COLLISIONS. Gary Ivey 129

SPACE USE OF WINTERING WHOOPING CRANES Kris Metzger, Mary Harner, Greg Wright, Wade Harrell, Aaron Pearse, Mark Bidwell, and David Baasch 130

SOCIAL LEARNING OF MIGRATORY PERFORMANCE. . Thomas Mueller, Sarah Converse, Robert O’Hara, Richard Urbanek, and William Fagan 130

PARENT-REARING AND RELEASING WHOOPING CRANES IN WISCONSIN. Glenn Olsen and Sarah Converse 131

BEHAVIORAL COMPARISON OF COSTUME AND PARENT-REARED WHOOPING CRANE CHICKS. Glenn Olsen, Anne Harshbarger, Anna Jiang, and Sarah Converse 131

A TECHNIQUE FOR AGING CRANES Glenn Olsen and Scott Hereford 132

MIGRATION ECOLOGY OF ARANSAS-WOOD BUFFALO WHOOPING CRANES

.Aaron Pearse, David Brandt, Mary Harner, Kris Metzger, Wade Harrell, Mark Bidwell, and David Baasch 132

THE SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL USE OF HABITATS BY A REINTRODUCED POPULATION OF WHOOPING CRANES IN LOUISIANATandi Perkins and Sammy King 133

BEHAVIOR ECOLOGY OF PEN-REARED, REINTRODUCED WHOOPING CRANES WITHIN THE LOUISIANA LANDSCAPETandi Perkins and Sammy King 133

CAPTURE OF SANDHILL CRANES USING ALPHA-CHLORALOSE. Lauren Schneider, Michael Engels, Matthew Hayes, Jeb Barzen, and Barry Hartup 134

A COMPREHENSIVE HABITAT TYPE DATASET FOR WHOOPING CRANE CONSERVATION PLANNING IN TEXAS, USA. Elizabeth Smith, Felipe Chavez-Ramirez, and Luz Lumb 135

EGG PRODUCTION BY FIRST-TIME BREEDERS IN THE EASTERN MIGRATORY POPULATION OF WHOOPING CRANES. Eva Szyszkoski 135

NATAL DISPERSAL OF WHOOPING CRANES IN THE REINTRODUCED EASTERN MIGRATORY POPULATION: THE FIRST TEN YEARS Hillary Thompson and Anne Lacy 136

CHANGES IN WINTER DISTRIBUTION OF THE REINTRODUCED EASTERN MIGRATORY WHOOPING CRANE POPULATION Richard Urbanek, Eva Szyszkoski, and Sara Zimorski 136

PAIR FORMATION IN THE REINTRODUCED EASTERN MIGRATORY WHOOPING CRANE POPULATION.Richard Urbanek, Eva Szyszkoski, Sara Zimorski, and Lara Fondow 137

A PRELIMINARY LOOK AT THE DEVELOPMENT AND TIMING OF CUES INFLUENCING PHILOPATRY IN CAPTIVE-BRED WHOOPING CRANES RELEASED USING THE MODIFIED DIRECT AUTUMN RELEASE METHODMarianne Wellington and Eva Szyszkoski 137

EGG FERTILITY RATE OF THE REINTRODUCED EASTERN MIGRATORY WHOOPING CRANE POPULATION 2005-2012. Amelia Whitear and Anne Lacy 138

REMOTE CAMERAS AID CRANE BEHAVIOR STUDIES: WET MEADOW UTILIZATION BY SANDHILL CRANES ALONG THE PLATTE RIVER, NEBRASKA.Greg Wright and Mary Harner 138

RECOVERY AND MANAGEMENT IN A FIELD ENVIRONMENT OF A JUVENILE WHOOPING CRANE FOLLOWING SURGERY TO REPAIR A FRACTURED LEFT CORACOID Sara Zimorski, James Lacour, Javier Nevarez, Katrin Saile, Jamie Wignall, João Brandão, Abbi Granger, and Patricia Queiroz-Williams 139

WHOOPING CRANES RETURN TO LOUISIANA: THE FIRST THREE YEARS. Sara Zimorski, Tandi Perkins, Vladimir Dinets, and Sammy King 140

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