US Geological Survey

 

Authors

Ian M. Miller, Denver Museum of Nature and ScienceFollow
Jeffrey S. Pigati, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center
R. Scott Anderson, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff
Kirk R. Johnson, Denver Museum of Nature and Science
Shannon A. Mahan, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center
Thomas A. Ager, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center
Richard G. Baker, University of Iowa, Iowa City
Maarten Blaauw, Queen's University Belfast
Jordon Bright, University of Arizona, Tucson
Peter M. Brown, Rocky Mountain Tree-Ring Research
Bruce Bryant, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center
Zachary T. Calamari, University of Michigan
Paul E. Carrara, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center
Michael D. Cherney, University of Michigan
John R. Demboski, Denver Museum of Nature and Science
Scott A. Elias, University of London, Egham
Daniel C. Fisher, University of Michigan
Harrison J. Gray, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center
Danielle R. Haskett, University of Georgia, Athens
Jeffrey S. Honke, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center
Stephen T. Jackson, University of Wyoming, Laramie
Gonzalo Jiménez- Moreno, Universidad de Granada, Fuente Nueva
Douglas Kline, Denver Museum of Nature and Science
Eric M. Leonard, Colorado College, Colorado Springs
Nathaniel A. Lifton, Purdue University, West Lafayette
Carol Lucking, Denver Museum of Nature and Science
H. Gregory McDonald, Museum Management Program, National Park Service
Dane M. Miller, University of Wyoming, Laramie
Daniel R. Muhs, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center
Stephen E. Nash, Denver Museum of Nature and Science
Cody Newton, University of Colorado, Boulder
James B. Paces, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center
Lesley Petrie, University of California Santa Cruz
Mitchell A. Plummer, Idaho National Laboratory
David F. Porinchu, University of Georgia, Athens
Adam N. Rountrey, University of Western Australia
Eric Scott, San Bernardino County Museum
Joseph J.W. Sertich, Denver Museum of Nature and Science
Saxon E. Sharpe, Desert Research Institute
Gary L. Skipp, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center
Laura E. Strickland, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center
Richard K. Stucky, Denver Museum of Nature and Science
Robert S. Thompson, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center
Jim Wilson, Aeon Laboratories

Date of this Version

2014

Citation

Quaternary Research 82 (2014) 618–634

doi 10.1016/j.yqres.2014.07.004

Comments

US government work

Abstract

In North America, terrestrial records of biodiversity and climate change that span Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 are rare. Where found, they provide insight into how the coupling of the ocean–atmosphere system is manifested in biotic and environmental records and how the biosphere responds to climate change. In 2010–2011, construction at Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado (USA) revealed a nearly continuous, lacustrine/wetland sedimentary sequence that preserved evidence of past plant communities between ~140 and 55 ka, including all of MIS 5. At an elevation of 2705 m, the Ziegler Reservoir fossil site also contained thousands of well-preserved bones of late Pleistocene megafauna, including mastodons, mammoths, ground sloths, horses, camels, deer, bison, black bear, coyotes, and bighorn sheep. In addition, the site contained more than 26,000 bones from at least 30 species of small animals including salamanders, otters, muskrats, minks, rabbits, beavers, frogs, lizards, snakes, fish, and birds. The combination of macro- and micro-vertebrates, invertebrates, terrestrial and aquatic plant macrofossils, a detailed pollen record, and a robust, directly dated stratigraphic framework shows that high-elevation ecosystems in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado are climatically sensitive and varied dramatically throughout MIS 5.