Animal Science Department

 

Date of this Version

12-2012

Citation

Titlow, A. H. 2012. GRAZING COVER CROPS AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO FALLOW AND THE INTERACTION BETWEEN CORN PROCESSING METHOD AND CONDENSED DISTILLERS SOLUBLES. MS Thesis, University of Nebraska.

Comments

A THESIS Presented to the Faculty of The Graduate College at the University of Nebraska In Partial Fulfillment of Requirements For the Degree of Master of Science, Major: Animal Science, Under the Supervision of Professors Karla H. Jenkins and Terry J. Klopfenstein. Lincoln, Nebraska: December, 2012

Copyright (c) 2012 Alex H. Titlow

Abstract

Recently, producers in dryland wheat farming regions have made a shift from the typical winter wheat fallow rotation to a no-till system paired with cover crops. Cover crops have been shown to minimize these problems associated with the conventional fallow and possibly provide a source of forage. A 2-year grazing study was conducted to evaluate forage quality and utilization of cover crops (CC) planted to replace fallow in no-till wheat systems compared to crested wheatgrass pastures (CWP). Hand clipped and diet samples were greater in digestibility and CP for CC compared to CWP. The NDF and ADF content of the hand clipped and diet samples were less in CC compared to CWP. Forage production for CC was less in 2011 compared to CWP. In 2012, forage production was similar for CC compared to CWP. Forage utilization for both years was similar for CC and CWP.

An interaction exists when comparing corn processing methods and increased concentrations of wet distillers grains with solubles (WDGS). However, little research is available studying the interaction between corn processing method and concentration of CDS. An experiment was conducted to test the interaction between condensed distillers solubles (CDS) and corn processing method in finishing diets. Interactions were observed between corn processing method and CDS concentration for final BW, ADG, and G:F. Within DRC based diets, final BW, ADG, and G:F increased quadratically with increasing concentration of CDS. The greatest final BW and ADG were observed at the 15% concentration of CDS. The greatest G:F was observed with the 30% concentration of CDS for DRC. For SFC based diets, linear improvements were observed in final BW and ADG as CDS concentration increased. A quadratic improvement in G:F was observed where greatest G:F was observed at the 30% CDS concentration. Replacing either DRC or SFC with CDS improved performance.

Advisers: Karla H. Jenkins and Terry J. Klopfenstein

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